Dentures

What are dentures?

Dentures, which replace weak or missing teeth, are removable dental appliances that can behave as either a full or partial set of teeth in one or more areas of your mouth. Whereas conventional types of dentures rest on the gum and may be attached to the natural teeth, implant-supported dentures are attached to a foundation that is surgically fixed into the jawbone.

If you’ve lost all of your natural teeth, whether from gum disease, tooth decay or injury, replacing missing teeth will benefit your appearance and your health. That’s because dentures make it easier to eat and speak better than you could without teeth, things that people often take for granted.

When you lose all of your teeth, facial muscles can sag, making you look older. Dentures can help fill out the appearance of your face and profile. They can be made to closely resemble your natural teeth so that your appearance does not change much. Dentures may even improve the look of your smile.

types of dentures



Full Dentures


Dentures for replacing a full set of teeth are called full dentures. To replace teeth in the upper jaw, these dentures include a flesh-colored acrylic base that covers the gums and the roof of the mouth, allowing an entire set of false teeth to sit firmly. Full dentures for the lower mouth are similar, but the acrylic base is shaped like a horseshoe to avoid covering the tongue.



Partial Dentures


When just a few teeth are missing, partial dentures fill the gap. They can be attached to natural teeth in several ways, the most conventional of which uses metal clasps that grip the natural teeth.

Another option the dentist may offer is a partial denture, which adheres with precision attachments that are less noticeable. Partial dentures can also be attached to crowns on the natural teeth. These crowns can actually improve the fit of partial dentures, and are often required with precision attachments.



Implant-supported dentures


Implant-supported Dentures are attached to implants in the jawbone that extend outward from the gums. A dentist surgically fits these implants and they remain in place.

An advantage to implant-supported dentures is that they are more stable than other types of dentures, especially in the lower jaw, where conventional dentures are most likely to slip out of place. The implants are usually fitted at the front of the jaw.



How to take care of dentures?

Just like teeth, your dentures should be brushed daily to remove food particles and plaque. Brush your gums, tongue and roof of your mouth every morning with a soft-bristled brush before you insert your dentures to stimulate circulation in your tissues and help remove plaque. Brushing also helps the teeth from staining.

Tips to maximize dentures life and efficacy


  • Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris.
  • Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don't get scratched.
  • Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don't get scratched.
  • When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, roof of your mouth and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath.
  • When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping.
  • Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. Your dentist can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives

Full Denture

Example of a full denture.

Dentures Gallery

Full Denture

Implant-Supported Denture

Partial Denture

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